What Is the Software Testing Life Cycle? A Complete Guide

Presenting a perfect product to the customer is the end goal of every organization. But did you know that there was a time when testing wasn’t even a part of the software development life cycle (SDLC)? Nothing puts off customers more than bug-filled user experience. So when enterprises realized this, they began to include testing […]

What Is the Software Testing Life Cycle? A Complete Guide
By J Valdivia, Oct 10, 2019

Presenting a perfect product to the customer is the end goal of every organization. But did you know that there was a time when testing wasn’t even a part of the software development life cycle (SDLC)?

Nothing puts off customers more than bug-filled user experience. So when enterprises realized this, they began to include testing as a mandatory part of the SDLC. Since then, testing has become an integral part of every organization.

The competence of testing has evolved over the past few decades. Currently, testing is not about reporting bugs to the developer. It has a wide scope and is a mandatory phase to execute from the initial phases of a project.

With agile, an application’s testing life cycle became more process-oriented and versatile. Usually, the entire focus of an enterprise is on the SDLC alone. And they consider testing a part of that process. But it’s high time that firms realize that software testing has a life cycle of its own. In this post, we are going to take a look at the role of the software testing life style (STLC) and its phases in detail. So let’s dive right in!

What Is the Software Testing Life Cycle?

Let’s first understand the term life cycle before getting into all the details. A life cycle is the sequence of changes an entity goes through from one form to another. Many concrete and obscure entities go through a series of changes from start to finish.

When we talk about the software testing life cycle, the software is an entity. The software testing life cycle is the process of executing different activities during testing.

These activities include checking the developed software to see if it meets specific requirements. If there are any defects in the product, testers work with the development team. In some cases, they have to contact the stakeholder to gain insight into different product specs. Validation and verification of a product are also important processes of the STLC.

What Is the Role of STLC? 

Now that we have the gist of what the software testing life cycle is, let’s take a look at why it’s essential. Even if a firm has the best programmers and developers, they are bound to make mistakes. The main role of STLC is to find those mistakes and get them fixed. The main goal of conducting an STLC is to maintain product quality.

Gone are the days when mediocre testing was the trend. In today’s world, businesses need to conduct detailed testing.

From planning and research to execution and maintenance, every phase plays a crucial role in testing a product.

SDLC is all about assuring the product’s quality. Every application has different attributes such as reliability, functionality, and performance. And STLC aids in enhancing these attributes and facilitates the delivery of an ideal end-product.

A high-quality product results in lower maintenance costs in the long run. The stability of an application or software is a must to entice new users. Apart from that, consistently reliable products also help keep existing clientele. For a product to stay in the realm of business, it’s important to focus on each phase of the STLC.

Phases of Software Testing Life Cycle

Validating every module of software or application is a must to ensure product precision and accuracy. Since software testing itself is an elaborate process, testers carry it out in phases. Complexities can pop up if testing lacks organization. The complexities may include unresolved bugs, undetected regression bugs, or in the worst case, a module that skipped testing because the deadline got closer.

Each phase of the STLC has a specific goal and deliverables. It involves the initiation, execution, and termination of the testing process.

Let’s take a look at different phases of the software testing life cycle in detail.

1. Requirement Analysis

Your valuable software testers have to view, study, and analyze the available specifications and requirements. Certain requirements produce outcomes by feeding them with input data. These requirements are testable requirements. Testers study both functional and non-functional requirements. After that, they have to pick out testable requirements.

Activities in this phase include brainstorming for requirement analysis and identifying and prioritizing test requirements. They also include picking out requirements for both automated and manual testing.

2. Test Planning

The third step is test planning, and the QA team creates this plan after analyzing all the necessary testing requirements. They outline the scope and objectives after understanding the product domain. The team then analyzes the risks involved and defines time schedules and testing environments to create a strategy. After that, management finalizes the tools and assigns roles and responsibilities to individuals. An approximate timeline is also defined by which the testing of each module should be completed.

To sum it up, the two primary outcomes of this phase include test plan documentation and an estimation of time and efforts.

3. Test Case Designing and Development

After development and planning, it’s time to let the creative juices flow! Based on the test plan, testers design and develop test cases. Next comes the verification and validation of specified requirements in the documentation stage. Also, the reviewing, updating, and approval of automation scripts and test cases are essential processes of this stage. This phase also includes defining different test conditions with input data and expected outcomes.

4. Test Environment Setup

Testing activities need certain environmental factors—such as servers, frameworks, hardware, and software—for executing developed test cases. Software and hardware configuration, along with test data setup, are the main components of this phase. And it’s mandatory to smoke test and to equip your testers with bug reporting tools.

It’s the job of the QA manager supervising the team to take care of setting up the test environment.

5. Test Execution

An application is ready for testing once the team is done with all the previous phases. According to the test plan, the testers execute test cases. They also identify, detect, and log the defects, thus reporting the bugs. The team is also responsible for comparing expected results with the real outcome.

Once the development team removes a bug, regression testing begins. Regression testing is to ensure that the software or application works even after deploying a change. 

6. Test Closure

And that brings us to the last stage of the STLC: test closure.

The end of test execution and delivery of the end product marks the onset of the test closure phase. The QA team checks the test results and discusses them with other team members. Some other factors they consider are product quality, test coverage, and project cost.

Apart from that, the team also considers test metrics, the fulfillment of goals, and their adherence to deadlines. Once they have a total grasp on what happened, they can evaluate the entire testing strategy and process.

What Are the Entry and Exit Criteria for Testing?

All six phases of a software testing life cycle have entry or exit criteria associated with them. Testers need to finish executing the test cases within a fixed time. Also, they need to maintain the quality, functionality, and efficiency of the end product. Therefore, defining entry and exit criteria is a must. That’s what we’ll do now.

Entry Criteria

Entry criteria state which requirements the team has to take care of before starting the testing procedure. Before testing begins, it’s mandatory to cross off all requirements.

There are some ongoing activities and conditions that have to be present before testing begins. First, you need input from the development team. You’ll also want to examine the test plan, test cases and data, the testing environment, and your code.

Exit Criteria

Exit criteria state the requirements and actions to complete before the testing ends. In other words, they include items to cross off the task list and processes to complete before testing comes to a halt.

Exit criteria will include the identification of high-priority defects. You’ll need to get those fixed right away. Testers have to pass different test cases and ensure full functional coverage.

Conclusion

Simply identifying errors in the last stage of an SDLC is not an efficient practice anymore. There are various other daily activities a firm has to focus on. Devoting too much of your precious time to testing and fixing bugs can hamper efficiency. After all, you’ll take more time to generate less output.

To ease the testing process, it’s important to make efficient use of time and resources. Following a systematic STLC not only results in quick bug fixing but it also enhances the product quality. By increasing customer satisfaction, you’ll enjoy an increased ROI and improved brand presence.

This post was written by Arnab Roy Chowdhury. Arnab is a UI developer by profession and a blogging enthusiast. He has strong expertise in the latest UI/UX trends, project methodologies, testing, and scripting.

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