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Introduction

We work hard to improve the functionality and usability of our autonomous testing platform to support your software quality initiatives. With that said, we’re thrilled to release a few of your most requested features; negative validation, extract value, and integration to test management. Check them out and let us know what you think.

Negative Validation

What is it?

Validations are the most important steps we need in our tests. Validations allow us to see if our app does what we expect it to do. Testim provides a wide range of validation options so you can choose the ones that best suit your needs. Now you can choose a negative validation.

  • Element Not Visible – Make sure an element is not visible to the user.

Why should I care?  
Use the element not visible validation to check whether your element does not exist/visible in the page.  Use this validation to make sure an element disappeared from the screen or wasn’t shown in the first place. Learn more

negative validation

Extract Value

What is it?

Extract value lets you copy values directly from your application to be used in later steps. For example, if you have text in your application such as username, name or account number use extract value to validate that it appears on another page. You can also use it to extract a value for future calculation at a later step.

Why should I care?
Now, you can use the new parameter in a validation step, set text, custom steps, etc. So if you want to change the element you selected, now you don’t have to re-record this step. Learn more

extract value

Integrate Test Management

What is it?

Testim can now sync your test results with TestRail so you can get a side by side view of your manual and automated tests.

Why should I care?

If your doing exploratory testing, now you can link your manual and automated tests to your requirements and defects for end to end traceability. Learn more

integrate test management

Customers have access to these features now. Check it out and let us know what you think. If you’re not a customer, sign up for a free trial to experience autonomous testing. We’d love to hear what you think of the new features. Please share your thoughts on Twitter or Facebook.

According to the US Software Engineering Institute, 50% of defects are due to bad specifications.

Are you managing a software team or responsible for looking at their end-to-end delivery processes holistically?

Then, join this round-table discussion with Sam Hatoum, CEO of Xolv.io as he shares how he’s implemented proper specifications throughout projects he’s worked on to increase velocity by up to 35% and reduce defect rates down to 2%.

Date: Tuesday, April 24
Time: 12:00pm PT
RESERVE MY SEAT

Why you should attend this session?

  • Get tips for balancing the tradeoff between velocity and quality
  • Learn how to smooth the transition between development phases while ensuring full alignment
  • See how your test automation strategy becomes a result of your upfront specification planning
  • Succeed in reducing defects before a single line of code is written
  • Minimize the handoffs between Engineering, Quality and Product
  • Capture some quick wins to implement quality practices that will
  • Influence cultural change, speed up release cycles and improve your customer’s experience

Engagio is a two year old marketing software startup that helps marketers land and expand their target accounts. The company is rapidly growing with more than 150 customers and 45 employees. Based in San Mateo, Engagio was founded by Jon Miller who was previously the Co-Founder of Marketo.  

Today, I had the pleasure of speaking with Helge Scheil, VP of Engineering for Engagio who shared why he selected Testim, his overall development philosophy and the results his team was able to achieve.  Checkout the series of videos or read the Q&A from our conversation below.

Q: Can you tell us a little about what your software does?

A: We help B2B marketers drive new business and expand relationships with high-value accounts. Our marketing orchestration software helps marketers create and measure engagement in one tool, drive ongoing success, and measure impact easily. Engagio orchestrates integrated account-based programs, providing the scale benefits of automation with the personalization benefits of the human touch. Our software complements Salesforce and existing marketing automation solutions.

Q: What does your development process look like?
A: Our developers work in 2-week sprints, developing features rapidly and deploying to production daily without any production downtime. We’re running on AWS and have the entire develop-test-build-deploy process fully automated. Each developer can deploy at any time, assuming all quality criteria have been met.

Q: What tools do you use to support your development efforts?

A: We are using Atlassian JIRA and Confluence for product strategy, roadmaps, requirements management, work breakdown, sprint planning and release management. We’re using a combination of Codeship, Python (buildbot), Docker, Slack, JUnit and Testim for our continuous build/test/deploy. We have integrated Testim into our deployment bot (which is integrated into Slack).

Q: Prior to Testim, how were you testing your software? What were some of the challenges?

A: Our backend had great coverage with unit and integration tests, including the API level. On the front-end we had very little coverage and the small amount we had was written in Selenium, which was very time-consuming with little fault-tolerance and many “flaky” failures.

Q: What were some things you tried to do to solve these challenges?

A: We were trying to simply allocate more time for Selenium tests to engineers. We considered hiring automation engineers but weren’t too fond of the idea because we believe in engineers being responsible for quality out of the gate, including the regression tests creation and maintenance.

Q: Where there other solutions you evaluated? Why did you select Testim?

A: We didn’t really consider any other solutions after we started evaluating Testim, which was our first vendor to evaluate. Despite some skepticism around the “record and play” concept, we found that Testim’s tolerance (meaning “tests don’t fail”) to UI and feature changes is much greater than we had expected. Other solutions that we considered are relying on pixels/images/coordinates which are inherently sensitive and non-tolerant to changes. We also found that non-engineers (i.e. product manager, functional QA engineers) can write tests, which is unlike Selenium.

Q: After selecting Testim, can you walk me through your getting started experience?

A: During the first week of implementation the team got together to learn the tool and started creating guinea pig tests which evolved into much deeper tests with more intricate feature testing. Those test ended up in our regression test suite which are ran nightly. Rather than allocating two days per sprint, we decided to crank up the coverage with a one day blitz.

Q: After using Testim, what were some the benefits you experienced?

A: We were able to increase our coverage by 4-5x within 6 weeks of using Testim. We can write more tests in less time and maintenance is not as time consuming. We integrated Testim via its CLI and made “run test <label>” commands available in our “deployment” Slack channel as well as a newly created “regression_test” channel. Any deployment that involves our web app now automatically runs our smoke tests. In addition to that we run nightly full regression tests. Running four cloud/grid Testim VMs in parallel we’re able to run our full regression test suite in roughly 10 minutes.

Q: How was your experience working with Testim’s support team?

A: Testim’s responsiveness was extraordinary. We found ourselves asking questions late in the evenings and over the weekends and the team was there to help us familiarize ourselves with the product. If it wasn’t immediately in the middle of the night, we would have the answer by the time we got started the next day.

Thank you to everyone who participated in our round table discussion on The Future of Test Automation: How to prepare for it? We had a fantastic turnout with lots of solid questions from the audience. If you missed the live event, don’t worry…

You can watch the recorded session any time:

Alan Page, QA Director at Unity Technologies and Oren Rubin, CEO of Testim shared their thoughts on:
  • The current state of test automation
  • Today’s test automation challenges
  • Trends that are shaping the future
  • The future of test automation
  • How to create your test automation destiny
In this session they also covered:
  • Tips and techniques for balancing end to end vs. unit testing
  • How testing is moving from the back end to the front end
  • How to overcome mobile and cloud testing challenges
  • Insights into how the roles of developers and testers are evolving
  • Skills you should start developing now to be ready for the future of testing

Some of the audience questions they answered:

  • How do we know what is the right amount of test coverage to live with a reasonable amount of risk?
  • What is the best way to get developers to do more of the testing?
  • How do you deal with dynamic data, is the best practice to read a DB and compare the results to the front end?
  • Does test automation mark the end of manual testing as we know it?

There were several questions that we were not able to address during the live event so I followed up with the panelist afterwards to get their answers.

Q: What is Alan’s idea of what an automated UI test should be?

As much as I rant about UI Automation, I wrote some a few weeks ago. The Unity Developer Dashboard provides quick access to a lot of Unity services for game developers. I wrote a few tests that walk through workflows and ensure that the cross-service integration is working correctly.

The important bit is, that I wrote tests to find issues that could only be found with UI automation. If validation of the application can be done at any lower level, that’s where the test should be written.

Q: The team I work on complex machines with Android UI and separate backend. What layer would you suggest to concentrate more testing effort on?

I’d weight my testing heavily on the backend and push as much logic as possible out of the Android UI and into the backend, where I can test more, and test faster.

Q: Some legacy applications are really difficult to unit test.  What are your suggestions in handling these kind of applications?

Read Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael Feathers, and you’ll find that adding unit tests to legacy code isn’t as hard as you thought it was.

Q: How do you implement modern testing to compliment automation efforts?

My mantra in Modern Testing is, Accelerate the Achievement of Shippable Quality. As “modern” testers, we sometimes do that by writing automated tests, but more often, we look at the system we use to make software – everything from the developer desktop all the way to deployment and beyond (like getting customer feedback), and look for ways we can optimize the system.

For example, as a modern tester, I make sure that we are running the right tools (e.g. static analysis) as part of the build process, that we are taking unit testing seriously and finding all the bugs that can be found by unit tests during unit testing. I try to find things to make it easier for the developers I work with to create high quality and high value tests (e.g. wrappers for templates, or tools to help automate their workflow). I make sure we have reliable and efficient methods for getting feedback from our customers, and that we have a tight loop of build-measure-learn based on that feedback.

Q: Alan Page could you give an example of a test that would be better tested (validated) at a lower level (unit) as opposed to UI level?

It would be easier to think of a test that would not be better validated at that level. Let’s say your application has a sign-in page. One could write UI automation to try different combinations of user names, email addresses, and passwords, but you could write tests faster (and run them massively faster) if you just wrote API tests to sign up users.

Of course, you’d still want to test the UI in this case, but I’d prefer to write a bunch of API tests to verify the system, and then exploratory test the UI to make sure it’s working well with the back end, has a proper look and feel, etc.

Q: How critical is today for a QA person to be able to code? In other words, if you are a QA analyst with strong testing/automation skills, but really have not had much coding experience, what would be the best way to incorporate some coding into his or her profile? Where would you start?

Technology is evolving in a rapid pace and the same applies to tools and programming languages as well. This being said, it would be good for testers to know the basics of some programming language in order to keep up with this pace. I would not say this is critical but it will definitely be good to have and with so many online resources available, it is even easier for testers to gain technical knowledge.

Some of the best ways I have known to incorporate coding into his/her profile would be via:

  • Online Tutorials and courses (Udemy, Coursera, Youtube videos)
  • Pairing with developers when they are programming. You can ask them basic questions of how things work, as and when they are coding. This is a nice way to learn
  • Attending code reviews helps to gain some insight into how the programming language works
  • Reading solutions to different problems on Stack Overflow and other forums
  • Volunteering to implement a simple feature in your system/tool/project by pairing with another developer
  • Organizing/Attending meetups and lunch ‘n’ learns focused on a particular programming language and topic
  • Choose a mentor who could guide you and give you weekly assignments to complete. Set clear goals and deadlines for deliverables

Q: My developers really like reusing cucumber steps, but I couldn’t make them write these steps. The adoption problem is getting the budget reallocated. Any advice for what I should do?

Reusing cucumber steps may not be necessarily a bad thing. It could also mean that the steps you may have written are really good and people can use them for other scenarios. In fact, this is a good thing in BDD (Behavior Driven Development) and helps in easier automation of these steps.

But if the developers are lazy and then reusing steps which do not make sense in a scenario, then we have a problem. In this case, what I would do is try to make developers understand why a particular step may not make sense for a scenario and discuss how you would re-write them. This continuous practice of spot feedback would help to instill the habit of writing good cucumber steps. Also, I would raise this point in retrospective and team meetings, and discuss it with the entire team. This will help to come to a common understanding of the expectations.

In terms of budget reallocation, I would talk to your business folks and project manager on the value of writing cucumber steps and how it helps to bring clarity in requirements, helps to catch defects early and saves a lot of time and effort which would otherwise be spent on re-work of stories due to unclear requirements and expectations for a feature.

Q: Can we quickly Capture Baseline Images using AI?

What exactly do you want the AI part to do? Currently, it’s not there are tools (e.g. Applitools and Percy.io) which can create a baseline very fast. I would expect AI to help in the future with setting the regions that must be ignored (e.g. field showing today’s date), and the closest thing I know is Applitools’ layout comparison (looking and comparing the layout of a page rather than the exact pixels, so the text can differ and the number of lines change, but still have a match).

Q: What are your thoughts on Automatic/live static code analysis?

Code analysis is great! It can help prevent bugs and add to code consistency inside the organization. The important thing to remember is that it never replaces functional testing and it’s merely another (orthogonal) layer which also helps.

Q: When we say ‘Automated Acceptance tests’, do they mean REST API automated tests which automation tool is good to learn?

No. They usually mean E2E (functional) tests, though acceptance tests should include anything related to approving a new release, and in some cases, this includes load/stress testing and even security testing.

Regarding good tools, For functional testing, I’m very biased toward Testim.io, but many prefer to code and choose Selenium or its mobile version Appium (though Espresso and Earl grey are catching on in popularity).

For API testing, there are too many, from the giant HP (Stormrunner) to medium sized Blazemeter, to small and cool solutions like APIfortress, Postman, Loadmill, and of course Testim.io.

Why not to call it full stack tests instead of e2e?

Mostly because e2e is used more often in the industry – but I actually prefer to use the google naming conventions, and just call tests small, medium, or large. Full stack / end-to-end tests fall in the large category.

“If it’s worth building, it’s worth testing” — Kent Beck, pioneer of Test Driven Development

Imagine this situation. It is 4:45 pm on a Friday afternoon, and a new feature on the company’s web application for generating sales reports is pushed to production. At 11:30 pm that night, the lead developer gets a frantic call from a customer — the new feature broke an existing business-critical feature. What if the team could have prevented the break in the first place? By including test automation from the beginning of the development process, this is possible.

What Is Testing?

Testing is crucial to many agile software development processes. Testing enables developers to know ahead of time if everything will work as expected. With a well-written set of tests, developers can know whether or not new additions to a codebase will break existing features and behavior. Testing processes become the crystal ball of the software development process.

crystal ball testing

Testing can be automated or performed manually, but automated testing allows software development teams to test code more quickly, frequently, and accurately. Software testers and developers can then free up their time and focus on the more difficult tasks at hand.

How To Develop For Testing

The key to being successful with test automation in the software development life cycle is to introduce it as early on as possible. While many developers recognize the importance of testing their software, the testing process is often times delayed until the end of the development cycle. Testing may even be dropped completely in order to make a deadline or meet budgetary restrictions.  

Those not using test automation may view testing as a burden or roadblock to developing and delivering an application. A well-written set of tests, however, can end up saving time during the development process. The key to this is to write them as soon as new features are developed. This practice is commonly known as Test Driven Development. Writing tests as one develops features also encourages better documentation and leads to smaller changes in the codebase at a given time. Taking smaller steps in creating and changing a codebase enables the developer to make sure that what he/she adds maintains the health of the codebase.

TDD

Just as one can adapt his/her development workflow to Test Driven Development, it is important to also adapt the way tests are written when leveraging automated tests. Automated tests typically contain three parts: the setup, the action to be tested, and the validation. The best tests are those that test just one item, so developers know exactly what breaks and how to fix it. Tests that combine multiple actions are more difficult to create and maintain as well as slower to run. Most importantly, complicated tests do not tell the developers exactly what is broken and still require additional debugging/exploration to get to the root of the problem.

Automated testing can be broken down into different types of tests, such as web testing, unit testing, and usability testing. While it may not be possible to have complete automated test coverage for every application, a combination of different types of testing can provide a comprehensive test suite that can be augmented by hands-on testing as well.

Platforms like Testim enable developers to automate web testing across multiple browsers, as if a user was testing the application hands-on. This enables both developers and testers to uncover issues that cannot be discovered using hands-on testing methods.

What causes a test to fail?

The purpose of testing software is to identify bad code. Bad code either does not function as expected or breaks other features in the software. Testing is important to developers as it allows them to quickly correct the bugs and maintain a healthy codebase that enables a team of developers to develop and ship new features

However, tests can fail for reasons that are not bad code. When doing hands-on testing, a failed test can even be the result of human error. With some automated testing suites, if a test is written for a button on a webpage with a certain identifier, and the identifier changes, that test will then fail the next time it is run.

failed tests

The failure of the button test may cause the developer to think something is wrong with thier code, and as a result, they may spend hours digging through endless lines of code to suss out the issue, only to find that it was the result of a bad test and not bad code.

How Does Testim Help With Testing?

Testim gives developers and testers a way to quickly create, execute, and maintain tests. It does this by adapting to the changes that are made during the software development cycle. Through machine learning algorithms, Testim enables developers to create tests that can learn over time. This could lead to things like automated testing that adapts to small changes like the ID of a button, which would create more reliable tests that developers and testers can trust to identify bad code.

Tests that are quick to create and run will transform the software development process into one that ships code quicker, so developers can spend their time developing.

According to the 2017 Test Benchmark Report, survey respondents want to achieve 50%-75% test automation.
Join this round-table discussion with Alan Page, QA Director at Unity Technologies and Oren Rubin, CEO of Testim as they discuss what companies need to start doing now to achieve their 5 year testing plans.
Date: Tuesday, February 27
Time: 9:00am PT
In this session they will cover:
  • The current state of test automation
  • Today’s test automation challenges
  • Trends that are shaping the future
  • The future of test automation
  • How to create your test automation destiny

RESERVE YOUR SEAT to:

  • Get tips and techniques for balancing end to end vs. unit testing
  • See how testing is moving from the back end to the front end
  • How to overcome mobile and cloud testing challenges
  • Gain insights into how the roles of developers and testers are evolving
  • Skills you should start developing now to be ready for the future of testing
  • Ask the panelists your own questions live

Introduction

We work hard to improve the functionality and usability of our autonomous testing platform, constantly adding new features. Our sprints are weekly with minor updates being released sometimes every day, so a lot is added over the course of a month. We share updates by email and social media but wanted to provide a monthly recap of the month’s latests enhancements, summarizing the big and small things we delivered to improve your success with the Testim.

API Testing

What is it?

Do you need to validate data that appears in the app against data from your back-end? Do you need to extract data to use in your tests? Then we have the feature for you.

We provide two types of API steps:

  • API action – Will be used when in need to get data and use it for calculation, or to save it for later use in the test.
  • Validate API – Will be used to validate an element against the API result data.

Why should I care?  
This capability makes it easy to do UI and API simultaneously. No need to toggle between do different systems nor integrate results. Author a UI test and automatically author an API test to ensure the application under test is working correctly. Read more

API Testing

Debug Step Parameters

What is it?

We’ve learned that enriched debugging can be a huge time saver. Debug the console errors and network errors automatically and see the failed steps in the DOM. You can see in each step all the parameters used during the run.

Why should I care?
This feature is helpful when you want to debug your runs and need to figure out which parameters were used in each step. Learn more

Debug step parameters

Company and Project Structure

What is it?

Large enterprises need the ability to manage multiple projects and various groups inside their organization. This feature makes it easy for admins to grant individual users access to specific projects. Earlier this year we’ve added support for a company structure with a company owner managing permissions and owners per project.

Why should I care?
This gives you more flexibility in managing the different groups inside your company and allows control over who has access to which projects. Learn more

Testim Project Management

Customers have access to these features now. Check it out and let us know what you think. If you’re not a customer, sign up for a free trial to experience autonomous testing. We’d love to hear what you think of the new features. Please share your thoughts on Twitter or Facebook.

 

DevOps is a term that refers to the evolving professional movement that supports a collaborative relationship between IT Operations and development, leading to the fast flow of planned work that has high deploy rates, and at the same time increasing the stability, resilience, security, and reliability of the production environment. DevOps came into view in 2009 when a squad of Belgian developers hosted DevOps Days, which supported collaboration between developers and operational staff.  As the cloud is in buzz these days, most developers have readily accepted it that ultimately impacts Ops. DevOps and cloud are closely connected to each other that this post maps out in detail.

DevOps is great as a concept, but it is difficult to execute in reality. As DevOps has grown widespread and differentiated, it has become critical to know how to reach the next level of advancement and truly develops a DevOps driven organization. On this note, have a look at IDC’s recently published DevOps 2.0 MaturityScape.

There is no doubt in saying that DevOps builds a closer working relationship between dev and ops teams, but more significantly it necessitates collaboration with groups spanning QA & testing, security and architecture. To sum up ,  this recommends, DevOps is likely to become everything – which according to my view is right –  DevOps is way better when it integrates cross-functional teams with the aim to deliver high-touch customer experiences quickly.

Implementing and accelerating DevOps are an important topics of discussion; and within this automation, the role of QA & testing, and how to align with security driven DevOps are key considerations. There is a rise in experimentation and utilization of containers and microservices; and more investments in hybrid cloud management, consistent integration/continuous delivery, automated code testing, application performance management have become important to promote the development of a DevOps driven organization. The idea, of course, is to know what investments will support fastening of your organization’s DevOps journey.

As per a recent stats, by the end of 2018, 90% of IT Projects will depend on the principles of experimentation, speed, and quality.

Though operational models and technology investment strategies are still progressing, we begin to observe a widening gap between those businesses in experimentation mode contrary to those that know the benefits and quickly deploying DevOps to speed up a business change.

IDC’s DevOps Conference will make you understand how to accelerate and navigate the DevOps journey and is the right opportunity to know more about this.

How DevOps dictates a new approach to the cloud.

1. Cloud is not always a great solution for systems

DevOps and Cloud offer various potential benefits for companies, but many of them have larger investments in infrastructure, for instance, a mainframe. In the 1990s, the “Death of the Mainframe” has been touted, but the general fact is there is no business case to change many of the systems they host with Cloud-based solutions. The value of these systems can be increased with the help of DevOps techniques and future-proofed to make sure they do not turn into a bottleneck in difficult end-to-end customer journeys.

2. Cloud Native is not many organizations’ first-term goal

Most of our clients are planning to migrate to Cloud, and plan to do so over a two year period, but few have made a move now. Cloud migration is a continuous process, and the decision to do so should depend on business requirements. This involves whether the enterprise shifts entirely to Cloud or selects a hybrid, whichever option they pick, they have to deliver high business value from their current systems up to the point they are replaced or migrated.

3. DevOps tools are interchangeable

DevOps allows businesses to centralize their working practices and culture to gain transformational speed along with the quality of delivery. The tools that support this are interchangeable throughout system types, providing long-lasting benefits no matter how business systems are operated. While simply migrating to Cloud can allow enterprises to scale, it does not increase delivery speed or quality by itself.

4. To maximize the benefits of Cloud in the future

To make the most out of Cloud, businesses need to accept new ways of working. Different services available from main Cloud providers are “DevOps” tools in their right, for instance, AWS CodePipeline. But as mentioned in the previous point “tools support working practices and culture”. With the right working practices and culture in place, you can make the optimum use of tools.

5. Can the Cloud run without DevOps?

As mentioned above, cloud computing offers various benefits. These benefits are particularly useful when strengthened by the DevOps approach, but does the cloud have much to provide if we take out DevOps?

Undoubtedly, “yes”—but not much. You can still use machines in a flexible and scalable manner without DevOps. You can also take advantage of the pay-per-use business model, in which you have the authority to turn off unused resources to stop unnecessary spending.

Though both the cloud and DevOps functions well separately, they are stronger when they are used jointly. You will need to use the cloud model for DevOps to achieve its full potential for flexibility and agility. Similarly, when using the cloud, knowingly or not, you will automate processes and store configuration in version control before you experience that you are really following DevOps practices.

Netflix’s Simian Army is a great example to know about the success that can result from the integration of cloud and DevOps. You might consider this is not right for your company as it follows “on-premises only deployment policy.” Nevertheless, there is a way to get benefited from the cloud approach.

Bottom Line

DevOps and the cloud help businesses to transform user interaction with software delivery strategically. Enterprises no longer struggle adaptation but instead improve adaptability. Consider the cloud as an instrument, then take DevOps as the facilitator. If DevOps is a means, then the driver is the cloud. DevOps and the cloud together foster the development and IT leaps from ‘wait for the right time’ to ‘active frequency’. If you want to learn more about their relation then you can take DevOps training from experts to master its concepts.

Danish Wadhwa


Author bio:

Danish Wadhwa is a strategic thinker and an IT Pro. With more than six years of experience in the  digital marketing industry, he is more than a results-driven individual. He is well-versed in providing high-end technical support, optimizing sales and automating tools to stimulate productivity for businesses.

2017 has been a phenomenal year for Testim, full of exponential growth and product enhancements.

We are proud that so many teams across the globe are utilizing our products to support their software quality initiatives. We want to thank our customers for helping us in making 2017 a huge success! As the leading provider of autonomous testing for Agile teams we would like to recap some of our shared accomplishments.  

100+ Customers Worldwide– Earlier this year, we earned the trust of our 100th customer. Our customers span across a dozen countries, executing more than 1M automated tests per month. We are thrilled to support their CI/CD efforts; reducing risk, faster time to market and releasing higher quality software.

Lightspeed Venture Partners Invests $5.6 Million in Testim– Lightspeed, a Silicon Valley-based early stage venture capital firm focused on accelerating disruptive innovations and trends in the Enterprise and Consumer sectors invested in Testim this past year. This is Testim’s second round of funding in 12 months. The funds will support Testim’s mission to help engineering teams make application testing autonomous and integrative to their agile development cycle.

Testim Delivers Many Highly Requested FeaturesOur customers are the ones that make the Testim community so special and inspire us to innovate. Some of the years most requested customer features include:

We want to express our utmost appreciation and gratitude to our customers, partners and peers in the industry for their continued support. We are thrilled to welcome 2018 and look forward to even more shared success together. Keep your eye out for mobile native, company structure, advanced reporting and much, much more.

Introduction

We work hard to improve the functionality and usability of our autonomous testing platform, constantly adding new features. Our sprints are weekly with minor updates being released sometimes every day, so a lot is added over the course of a month. We share updates by email and social media but wanted to provide a monthly recap of the month’s latests enhancements, summarizing the big and small things we delivered to improve your success with the Testim.

Test Reruns

What is it?

An easy and fast way to rerun a test with the exact parameters used in another run.

Why should I care?

When running large suites, many times you want to rerun a smaller subset of those tests that failed. Since tests fail for a number of reasons, this new capability allows you to test temporary errors or fixes. Reruns let you run a test with the same parameters as a previous test run with a click of a button. This will include all dynamic parameters, from the CLI, Test Data, and parameters exported from tests that ran before this one (via exportsGlobal). Learn more

test suite rerun

To Reuse or not to Reuse

What is is?

Reusing actions is one of the basic principles of programming. Testim always supported reuse, and now we push toward even more developer best practices. For every new group, API call, or custom code step that you create, Testim will prompt you for a (meaningful) name, and whether you would like to make this step shareable or not.

Why should I care?

This feature will save you time since you can author the test once and call it to be used in any suite of tests. This makes it faster to author tests when making changes to a shared group, but do not want it to affect other tests in the suite. You can find more information on Reuse in our docs

test reuse

Mobile Web

What is it?
Testim now supports the authoring and execution of tests for mobile web.

Why should I care?  
The number of mobile devices has suppressed the number of desktop computers. We all consume content through our mobile devices and users expect your application to provide superior experience regardless of the medium. Responsive websites look and behave differently than desktop hence require different tests. Learn more

mobile web

Customers have access to these features now. Check it out and let us know what you think. If you’re not a customer, sign up for a free trial to experience autonomous testing. We’d love to hear what you think of the new features. Please share your thoughts on Twitter or Facebook.

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